FAQs

What is the Renew Atlanta infrastructure bond program?

Renew Atlanta is an infrastructure improvement program for the City of Atlanta,Georgia.

This $250 million program—the first major investment in Atlanta’s aboveground infrastructure in more than a decade —is a first step toward resolving an infrastructure repair backlog of more than $900 million.

Mayor Kasim Reed and the Atlanta City Council worked together to develop this program, which will address Atlanta’s most critical needs first through $250 million in funds from general obligation bonds. These bond dollars will allow the City to make urgent repairs to Atlanta’s infrastructure without raising property taxes. Voters overwhelmingly approved the infrastructure bond program through two ballot questions in a special election held on March 17, 2015.

Bonds are considered one of the safest funding tools available to local governments. The City of Atlanta has received $250 million in General Obligation (GO) bonds with ad-valorem property tax revenues as pledged security for the payment debt service, a standard agreement for GO bonds. Over the course of two decades, the City will repay the low-interest bonds with approximately $20 million in annual cost savings identified by the Mayor’s Blue Ribbon Commission on Waste & Efficiency.

Because of the City’s good credit rating and strong financial management practices, the infrastructure bonds will not raise property taxes. Standard & Poor’s upgraded Atlanta’s rating from “A” to “AA” with a stable outlook, and Moody’s Investor Service affirms Atlanta’s Aa2 rating with a stable outlook.

What is the City of Atlanta TSPLOST program?

On November 8, 2016, Atlanta voters overwhelmingly approved two ballot referenda authorizing investment in transit and transportation infrastructure: the City of Atlanta TSPLOST (special purpose local option sales tax for transportation) and the MARTA (the Metropolitan Atlanta Rapid Transit Authority) expansion.

The TSPLOST took effect on April 1, 2017, and will generate approximately $300 million over a five-year period to fund significant and expansive transportation projects citywide.

Additionally, MARTA’s new half-penny sales tax for transit expansion and enhancements in the City of Atlanta took effect on March 1, 2017. Over a period of forty years, this half-penny sales tax will generate an estimated $2.6 billion, allowing MARTA to make major investments in transit infrastructure, including introducing high-capacity rail improvements, building new infill rail stations within the City, purchasing new buses, adding more frequent service, and introducing new bus routes. For more information about the MARTA sales tax proposal, visit the MARTA website.

Click here to view the TSPLOST fact sheet.

What is the City’s infrastructure backlog and how will the Renew Atlanta Bond and TSPLOST programs address this backlog?

The City of Atlanta has an infrastructure backlog of more than $900 million. With this $250 million investment, the City will make largest investment in the look, feel, and experience of Atlanta for residents and visitors in more than a decade.

The City has developed a comprehensive funding strategy to complete the remaining infrastructure projects. Other sources of funding include increasing capital budgets in the City’s annual budget, sales of assets, securing federal, state, and philanthropic grants, improving operational efficiency that results in new savings, corporate and private donations, and energy saving performance contract opportunities.

How will the City of Atlanta pay for the infrastructure projects?

Renew Atlanta: From March to June 2014, the Mayor’s Blue Ribbon Commission on Waste & Efficiency in Government was charged with identifying cost-saving strategies in City government to enable the City of Atlanta to make these necessary investments in City infrastructure without raising property taxes. The Commission identified up to $20 million in annual savings, which the City has already begun to implement. The City will repay the low-interest bonds over the course of 20 years. The City of Atlanta does not expect any need to raise property taxes.

TSPLOST: The TSPLOST will generate approximately $300 million over a five-year period to fund significant and expansive transportation projects citywide. The TSPLOST adds four-tenths of a penny in sales tax, or an additional 4 cents on a $10 purchase.

MARTA’s new half-penny sales tax for transit expansion and enhancements in the City of Atlanta took effect on March 1, 2017. Over a period of forty years, this half-penny sales tax will generate an estimated $2.6 billion, allowing MARTA to make major investments in transit infrastructure, including introducing high-capacity rail improvements, building new infill rail stations within the City, purchasing new buses, adding more frequent service, and introducing new bus routes. 

What projects will be funded through the bond program?

Over four hundred transportation and municipal facilities projects will be funded through the Renew Atlanta infrastructure bond. Transportation projects include replacing street lights to make your neighborhood safer, repairing and replacing outdated bridges to connect communities, synchronizing traffic lights to make your commute easier and reduce congestion, installing more bike lanes and complete streets projects for more transportation options, and building and repairing sidewalks, curbs, and ADA ramps for better mobility.

Facilities projects include upgrading recreation centers citywide, such as the rebuilding of the Martin Luther King, Jr. Recreation and Aquatic Center (Natatorium) with additional multi-purpose rooms and fitness amenities. Police and fire stations, community parks and art restoration projects will also be upgraded across the City.

What projects will be funded through the TSPLOST program?

In conjunction with the MARTA referendum, the two programs will implement high priority projects from the Connect Atlanta Plan, the City’s comprehensive transportation plan, the Atlanta Streetcar System Plan, and Concept3, the Atlanta region’s transit plan, and more than a dozen neighborhood and community plans that have been adopted in the last six years, and features projects in nearly all of the city’s commercial districts, including:

  • $66 million for the Atlanta BeltLine, which will allow the BeltLine to purchase all the remaining right of way to close the 22-mile loop;
  • $75 million for 15 complete streets projects;
  • $3 million for Phase 2 of the Atlanta Bike Share program;
  • $69 million for pedestrian improvements in sidewalks; and
  • $40 million for traffic signal optimization.

The projects also include high priority sidewalk and bikeway projects connecting our neighborhoods to 80 Atlanta Public Schools and all of Atlanta’s rail stations.

Our website currently features TSPLOST projects programmed for Year 1. View a complete TSPLOST Project list, as approved by voters, here.

How are the projects chosen and prioritized?

The Renew Atlanta infrastructure bond program was developed through years of research and through an extensive community engagement process, with more than 100 public meetings. Life safety issues, ADA needs and citywide impact were all considered when selecting projects.

TSPLOST projects were chosen through a rational process premised on a comprehensive strategy, long-standing priorities, project-readiness, ability to leverage current capital spending and the Renew Atlanta Bond program. 

When will the projects start and end?

KEY:  PE= Preliminary Engineering      |      ROW= Right of Way      |      CON= Construction

Project Phase Term Definition
Project Start date Indicates when projects will begin Preliminary Engineering (PE), Right of Way (ROW) and/or Construction (CON) design activities.
Construction Start date Indicates that design and ROW activities are completed and project construction is underway.
If the Construction Start date is blank, the project is likely in a conceptual phase where no design costs or construction start date has been assigned.
Project Completion date Indicates when all project-related work activities have been completed.
Percent Complete Indicates how far along a project is in its entire life cycle.
For example, a project with a 12% completion percentage is likely in the Design phase while a project with a 70% completion is likely in the Construction phase. A project with a 98% or higher is near completion.

All project details, including start dates and expected completion dates, can be accessed by clicking on the project name. Continue to check back as more details become available.

What do the All Projects, Active Projects, and Completed Projects tabs mean?

Each project category includes tabs that break down what phase the projects are in.

Project Tab Definition
All Projects Lists a general project list specific to a category.
Active Projects Lists which projects are currently underway. Active projects include projects that are undergoing Preliminary Engineering (PE), Right of Way (ROW) and Construction (CON) activities.
Completed Projects Indicates when all project-related work activities have been completed.

Where can I find a complete list of projects?

The Renew Atlanta Master Schedule provides a complete list of active projects with construction start and end dates, and Council Districts. The Master Schedule is updated monthly and can be found on our Home page. Please note that dates are subject to change in between monthly updates.

How long does the roadway striping process take?

Most of the City’s resurfacing projects, including Renew Atlanta’s, involve some form of pavement marking. The most common is a double-yellow centerline and single, white-edge skip lines, but crosswalks, stop bars, and arrows are equally important. In addition, the City evaluates paving projects for proposed bike routes, in close coordination, with the Department of Planning and Community Development and the Department of Public Works Office of Transportation.

The typical process on multi-lane roads is to paint the center and edge lines first until the asphalt cures for 2-4 weeks, then apply a permanent thermo-plastic material over the paint. On two lane roads, a reflective yellow foil tape is placed down on the hot surface to serve as the centerline while the asphalt is still hot.

There are few Georgia contractors that specialize in pavement markings. Consequently, when there is a high level of activity in the Atlanta market, we may experience delays that are often noticed by our citizens in the completion of projects. In addition, weather conditions play a major role in delaying pavement markings as well as associated Georgia Department of Transportation (GDOT) requirements that must be met. Therefore, markings can be delayed for an extended period of time after a street has already been resurfaced.

How can I remain engaged in the Renew Atlanta and TSPLOST programs?

The City of Atlanta is always eager to hear from residents and visitors. Some of the selected transportation and facilities projects will need public input as detailed plans are developed. Information about public meetings and upcoming events can be found on our Meetings page. You may also subscribe to project updates, public meeting and event announcements through our Project Update Portal. To sign up, you will simply need to create an account. (Standard messaging rates will apply if you choose to receive SMS message notifications.)

How can I do business with the City?

Click on contract opportunities to learn more about becoming a vendor with the City of Atlanta.